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Sue Dykes

Visiting Scholar

Sue Dykes became interested in questions surrounding human origins while taking RTB Reasons Institute courses—an experience that inspired her to begin graduate studies in paleoanthropology. She earned a PhD in paleoanthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she conducted groundbreaking research on the classification of hominid teeth. A resident of South Africa, she lived near some of the most important sites in her field and interacted regularly with leaders in human origins research.

Biography

Sue Dykes became interested in questions surrounding human origins while taking RTB Reasons Institute courses—an experience that inspired her to begin graduate studies in paleoanthropology. She earned a PhD in paleoanthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she conducted groundbreaking research on the classification of hominid teeth. A resident of South Africa, she lived near some of the most important sites in her field and interacted regularly with leaders in human origins research.

Originally from the UK, Sue and her husband Dennis raised a family in South Africa. There she served as the chairperson of a hospital/clinic outreach charity and was a sworn translator in French.

Sue unexpectedly passed away in August 2019 while on her way to the U.S. to begin work as a staff scholar at Reasons to Believe. She is survived by her husband and two married children. Her scholasticism, insight, and friendship made a lasting impact that continues to advance the kingdom of God.

Biography

Sue Dykes became interested in questions surrounding human origins while taking RTB Reasons Institute courses—an experience that inspired her to begin graduate studies in paleoanthropology. She earned a PhD in paleoanthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she conducted groundbreaking research on the classification of hominid teeth. A resident of South Africa, she lived near some of the most important sites in her field and interacted regularly with leaders in human origins research.

Originally from the UK, Sue and her husband Dennis raised a family in South Africa. There she served as the chairperson of a hospital/clinic outreach charity and was a sworn translator in French.

Sue unexpectedly passed away in August 2019 while on her way to the U.S. to begin work as a staff scholar at Reasons to Believe. She is survived by her husband and two married children. Her scholasticism, insight, and friendship made a lasting impact that continues to advance the kingdom of God.