Where Science and Faith Converge
  • Developing an Attitude of Gratitude

    September 11, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    A critical component of living a good (happy, satisfying, and meaningful) life is incorporating the concept of gratitude. Being aware of and appreciative for the good things one has been given can serve to transform one’s whole existence. This attitude of gratitude in life is one of the most important teachings from the historic Christian world-and-life view.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: C. John Collins

    September 6, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • Contemporary Criticism of Augustine’s Thought, Part 10

    September 6, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    While Augustine’s presentation and defense of classical Christian theism is strongly critiqued by some modern scholars (especially those who are skeptical and theologically liberal), his thinking continues to be embraced by many within Western Christendom. Two areas, in which Augustine is criticized even by sympathetic contemporary scholars, relate to his philosophical thinking and political power.

    • Blogs
  • Augustine’s View of Predestination: St. Augustine, Part 9

    August 28, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Although Pelagianism, a view that denies original sin and promotes the idea that salvation can be earned, went against Augustine’s views of grace through Christ, it did encourage Augustine to focus his thinking on the doctrine of predestination. In his early writings, Augustine taught predestination based upon God’s foreknowledge. The idea was that God merely chose those human beings whom He foreknew would freely choose to believe in Him.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: The Dalai Lama

    August 23, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • Top Ten Things Augustine Contributed to Philosophy, Part II

    August 21, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Last week’s post outlined five of the ten most influential contributions Augustine made in the philosophy world. Those contributions included the theory of time, how humans learn/express language, foundations of faith, the ontological argument, and the concept of doubt. The post will highlight five more of Augustine’s contributions and philosophical ideas.

    • Blogs
  • Top Ten Things Augustine Contributed to Philosophy, Part I

    August 15, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    While Augustine had no formal education in philosophy, he was nevertheless an intuitive philosopher with varied interests. He also left a deep and abiding influence on Western philosophical thought. Augustine especially used philosophy to complement his study of theology. The first part of this two-part post will outline a brief summary of five of the ten most significant ideas and theories that Augustine contributed to the field of philosophy.1

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: Alister McGrath, 3

    August 10, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • Theologian of Grace: St. Augustine, Part 8

    August 7, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Roman Catholicism and historic Protestantism both claim Augustine as one of their own. On one hand, his theological views concerning the nature of the church and the sacraments (arising from the Donatist controversy) significantly influenced the development of Roman Catholic theology. On the other hand, his theological perspective of the nature of original sin, the absolute necessity of grace in salvation, and predestination (arising from the Pelagian controversy) influenced how Protestants formulate their doctrinal views.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: John R. W. Stott

    August 2, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • In Pursuit of Truth: St. Augustine, Part 7

    August 1, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Augustine’s life (AD 354–430) can be divided into roughly two halves. The first half of his journey was spent searching for the truth that would give meaning, purpose, and significance to his life. The second half was spent reflecting upon, explaining, defending, and living out the truth he encountered through faith in Jesus Christ. Given his life-long quest for truth, years of leadership in the church, and dramatic conversion, Augustine was able to make several contributions of enduring value.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: Gary R. Habermas

    July 26, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • The Restless Soul Finds Rest and Peace in Christ: St. Augustine, Part 6

    July 24, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Augustine’s dramatic conversion to Christianity came in the summer of AD 386, after much sorrowful reflection concerning his sinful state before God. He describes the experience in Confessions.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: J. I. Packer

    July 19, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • The Grace of God Closes In: St. Augustine, Part 5

    July 17, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    There are six important apologetics-related factors that can be identified as paving the way for Augustine’s conversion to Christianity.1 Augustine would later credit the sovereign grace of God’s work behind the scenes of his life as the source of these factors. From these six aspects, we can draw a broad apologetics model for how God, through His grace, prepares people for faith.

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: Kenneth D. Boa and Robert M. Bowman Jr.

    July 13, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • Worldly Ambition and Dissatisfaction: St. Augustine, Part 4

    July 10, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Augustine of Hippo (AD 354–430) was a gifted rhetorician and after teaching in his hometown of Thagaste for some time, he opened a school in Carthage. But Carthage’s unruly students and a personal hope for greater success elsewhere soon motivated Augustine to leave for Rome. In moving to the Eternal City, Augustine believed that a man of his ability could aspire to greatness and possibly reach the upper echelon of Rome’s power structure.

    • Blogs
  • Not of this World: Independence Day Reflections

    July 3, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    Popular Christian bumper stickers featuring the letters “NOTW” remind drivers that Christ’s kingdom is “not of this world” and that His followers are “foreigners and exiles” in this world. For many American Christians, however, our spiritual loyalty can often get tangled with patriotism. How can we claim to be “not of this world” and yet still honor our earthly nations?

    • Blogs
  • Quote of the Week: William Lane Craig

    June 29, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
    • Blogs
  • Exploring Manichaeism: St. Augustine, Part 3

    June 26, 2012
    By Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author

    In his search for an alternative to catholic Christianity, Augustine of Hippo (AD 354–430) turned to a religious sect known as Manichaeism, which promised to synthesize Christ’s “true” teachings with classical wisdom. The Manichees1 followed the teaching of Mani (AD 216–277), a Persian religious leader who was crucified for claiming to be the Paraclete and restorer of the true teaching of Christ. An odd blend of materialism and dualism, Manichaeism taught that the world was dominated by two co-eternal and opposed principles, one benevolent (Ormuzd: “light”), and one malevolent (Ahriman: “darkness”). These two “realities” were responsible for bringing eternal strife and conflict to the world. Like the Gnostics, the Manichees believed that Christ was solely spiritual, had no material body, and did not actually die on the cross. The Manichees strongly opposed catholic Christianity.

    • Blogs

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