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frana
Author: Fazale Rana

I watched helplessly as my father died a Muslim. Though he and I would argue about my conversion, I was unable to convince him of the truth of the Christian faith.

I became a Christian as a graduate student studying biochemistry. The cell's complexity, elegance, and sophistication coupled with the inadequacy of evolutionary scenarios to account for life's origin compelled me to conclude that life must stem from a Creator. Reading through the Sermon on the Mount convinced me that Jesus was who Christians claimed Him to be: Lord and Savior.

Still, evangelism wasn't important to me - until my father died. His death helped me appreciate how vital evangelism is. It was at that point I dedicated myself to Christian apologetics and the use of science as a tool to build bridges with nonbelievers.

In 1999, I left my position in R&D at a Fortune 500 company to join Reasons to Believe because I felt the most important thing I could do as a scientist is to communicate to skeptics and believers alike the powerful scientific evidence - evidence that is being uncovered day after day - for God's existence and the reliability of Scripture.

  • Sophisticated Cave Art Evinces the Image of God

    May 23, 2018

    It’s a new trend in art. Museums and galleries all over the world are exploring the use of sounds, smells, and lighting to enhance the viewer’s experience as they interact with pieces of art. The Tate Museum in London is one institution pioneering this innovative approach to experiencing artwork. For example, on display recently at Tate’s Sensorium was Irish artist Francis Bacon’s Figure in a Landscape, a piece that depicts a gray human figure on a bench. Visitors to the Sensorium put on headphones while they view this painting, and they hear sounds of a busy city. Added to the visual and auditory experiences are the bitter burnt smell of chocolate and the sweet aroma of oranges that engulf the viewer. This multisensory experience is meant to depict a lonely, brooding figure lost in the never-ending activities of a city, with the contrasting aromas simultaneously communicating the harshness and warmth of life in an urban setting.

    • Image of God
    • Human Uniqueness
    • Adam & Eve
  • A Genetically Engineered Case for a Creator

    May 9, 2018

    Since the 1960’s, the drug noscapine has been used in many parts of the world as a non-narcotic cough-suppressant. Recently, biomedical researchers have learned that that noscapine (and chemically-modified derivatives of this drug) has potential as a cancer drug. And that is nothing to sneeze at.

    • Life in the Lab
    • Artificial Life
  • Did Neanderthals Produce Cave Paintings?

    April 25, 2018

    One time when our kids were little, my wife and I discovered that someone had drawn a picture on one of the walls in our house. Though all of our children professed innocence, it was easy to figure out who the culprit was, because the little artist also wrote the first letter of her name on the wall next to her “masterpiece.”

    • Human Uniqueness
    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Image of God
    • Human Origins
  • Why Are Whales So Big? In Wisdom God Made Them That Way

    April 18, 2018

    When I was in high school, I had the well-deserved reputation of being a wise guy—though the people who knew me then might have preferred to call me a wise—, instead. Either way, for being a wise guy, I sure didn’t display much wisdom during my teenage years.

    • Design
    • Biology
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  • Mitochondria’s Deviant Genetic Code: Evolution or Creation?

    April 11, 2018

    Before joining Reasons to Believe, I worked for nearly a decade in research and development (R&D) for a Fortune 500 company. During my tenure, on several occasions I was assigned to work on a “resurrected” project—one that was mothballed years earlier for one reason or another but was then deemed worthy of another go-around by upper management.

    • Common Design vs. Common Descent
    • Design
    • Evolution
    • Biochemistry
  • Did Neanderthals Have the Brains to Make Art?

    April 4, 2018

    Are you a left-brain or a right-brain person? In the 1960s, Nobel laureate Roger W. Sperry advanced the idea of the split-brain, with each hemisphere involved in distinct activities. According to this model, the activities of the left hemisphere of the brain include thinking in words, logic, and mathematics while the right hemisphere’s activities include imagination, artistic expression, intuition, and feeling. The popular narrative is that some people, such as artists and musicians, have a more dominant right brain. And people such as scientists and engineers, have a dominant left brain. As it turns out, there is no truth to this idea. Although the activities of the two hemispheres differ, no evidence exists that one side of the brain is more dominant in some people than the other. In reality, both sides of the brain work together to carry out any task.

    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Image of God
  • Are Perforated Shells Evidence for Neanderthal Symbolism?

    March 28, 2018

    When my kids were little, there was a good chance my wife and I would spend our Saturday afternoons hanging out at Chuck E. Cheese’s, while our children ran wild, celebrating the birthday of one of their friends. They loved it. My wife and I endured the chaos (and the mediocre pizza). Two things that helped me through those Saturday afternoons were:

    • Human Uniqueness
    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Hominids
  • Believing Impossible Things: Convergent Origins of Functional Junk DNA Sequences

    March 14, 2018

    In a classic scene from Alice in Wonderland, the story’s heroine informs the White Queen, “One can’t believe impossible things,” to which, the White Queen—scolding Alice—replies, “I daresay you haven’t had much practice. When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

    • Junk DNA & Bad Designs
    • Convergence
  •  
  • Protein Amino Acids Form a “Just-Right” Set of Biological Building Blocks

    February 21, 2018

    Like most kids, I had a set of Lego building blocks. But, growing up in the 1960s, the Lego sets were nothing like the ones today. I am amazed at how elaborate and sophisticated Legos have become, consisting of interlocking blocks of various shapes and sizes, gears, specialty parts, and figurines—a far cry from the square and rectangular blocks that made up the Lego sets of my youth. The most imaginative things I could ever hope to build were long walls and high towers.

    • Optimization
    • Proteins
    • Intelligent Design
    • Design
    • Biochemistry
  • Love Is in the Air and It Smells Like Intelligent Design

    February 14, 2018

    Being the hopeless romantic, I worked hard last year to come up with just the right thing to say to my wife on Valentine’s Day. I decided to let my lovely bride know that I really liked her signaling traits. Sadly, that didn’t go over so well.

    • Image of God
    • Intelligent Design
    • Human Uniqueness
    • Design
  • Rabbit Burrowing Churns Claims about Neanderthal Burials

    February 7, 2018

    As a kid, watching cartoons was one of the highlights of my afternoons. As soon as I arrived home from school, I would plop down in front of the TV. Among my favorites were the short features produced by Warner Brothers. What a wonderful cast of characters: Daffy Duck, Sylvester and Tweety, Yosemite Sam, the Tasmanian Devil, the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote. As much as I loved to watch their shenanigans, none of them compared to the indomitable Bugs Bunny. That “wascally wabbit” (to quote Elmer Fudd) always seemed to create an upheaval everywhere he went.

    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Human Uniqueness
    • Human Origins
    • Hominids
  • Is the Laminin “Cross” Evidence for a Creator?

    January 31, 2018

    As I interact with people on social media and travel around the country to speak on the biochemical evidence for a Creator, I am frequently asked to comment on laminin.1 The people who mention this protein are usually quite excited, convinced that its structure provides powerful scientific evidence for the Christian faith. Unfortunately, I don’t agree.

    • Design
    • Intelligent Design
    • Proteins
    • Biochemistry
  •  
  • Did Neanderthals Self-Medicate?

    January 24, 2018

    Recently, researchers from Australia and the UK studied the calculus scraped from the teeth of Neanderthals and compared it to the calculus taken from the teeth of modern humans and chimpanzees (captured from the wild) with the hope of understanding the diets and behaviors of these hominins.

    • Human Uniqueness
    • Image of God
    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Human Origins
    • Anthropology
  • Does Development of Artificial Intelligence Undermine Human Exceptionalism?

    January 17, 2018

    On one hand, it appeared to be nothing more than a harmless publicity stunt. On October 25, 2017, Saudi Arabia granted Sophia—a lifelike robot, powered by artificial intelligence software—citizenship. This took place at the FII conference, held in Riyahd, providing a prime opportunity for Hanson Robotics to showcase its most advanced robotics system to date. And, it also served as a chance for Saudi Arabia to establish itself as a world leader in AI technology.

    • Synthetic Biology
    • Science Technology
    • Controversies
    • Anthropology
  • Did Neanderthals Make Glue?

    January 10, 2018

    Fun fact: each year, people around the world purchase 50 billion dollars’ (US) worth of adhesives. But perhaps this statistic isn’t all that surprising—because almost everything we make includes some type of bonding agent.

    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Human Uniqueness
    • Human Origins
  • New Research Douses Claim that Neanderthals Mastered Fire

    January 3, 2018

    A few months ago, I posted a link on Twitter to a blog article I wrote challenging the claim that Neanderthals made jewelry and, therefore, possessed the capacity for symbolism.

    • Human Origins
    • Hominids
    • Neanderthals/Hominids
    • Anthropology
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